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Table of Contents

History 

Programs and Services

Board of Directors

Staff Biographies

Annual Report 2015

Newsletters

Partners

Housing

In the News

Facebook and Twitter

Adopt-a-Day Brochure

Young Adult Program Pamphlet
 

 

About Pacific House
In 1985 the emergency shelter opened its doors in the form of a makeshift shelter in the basement of the First Congregational Church in downtown Stamford. Soon, under the sponsorship of The Council of Churches and Synagogues, the basement shelter was serving 60 people a night. On July 24, 1985 a Board of Directors was formed and Shelter for the Homeless became an independent nonprofit service agency. The shelter began offering overnight emergency shelter, showers, and limited case management services. 

In 1988 the Board of Directors successfully purchased and renovated the building at 597 Pacific Street which was to become “Pacific House,” and in 1990 Pacific House opened its doors, operating 24 hour/day, 365 days/year. Since then, Shelter for the Homeless has continually recognized and responded to the needs of the homeless community in our area, and has expanded its impact to now serve the communities of Stamford, New Canaan, Greenwich and Darien.  Here is an overview of the services the organization provides and the effect it is having.

There is still a long way to go, but progress is being made:

Food

  • Over 30 years, an estimated 1.5 million meals have been served.
  • Each month 85% of all meals are prepared and served by members of the community through the Meal-a-Month program whereby religious groups, businesses, community organizations and families from all over lower Fairfield County volunteer one day of each month to prepare and serve dinner at the shelter. The community has embraced this program, with some groups having participated for 20+ years.

Shelter

  • Over 30 years, approximately 900,000 bed-nights have been provided by the shelter.
  • Today, 42 formerly homeless men are living in permanent affordable housing created and operated by the organization, and by the end of 2017, that number will rise to 94.
  • Participating in the state’s 100-day challenge to reduce homelessness, the organization joined forces with other agencies to house 92 individuals and 68 families from Fairfield County, and matched another 80 to housing resources.

Counseling
Case managers work closely with clients to develop plans based on individual needs and provide weekly counseling sessions.

Healthcare
An onsite healthcare program was developed in partnership with Optimum Health Care, Inc., providing medical screenings for approximately 5,000 men since its creation and 2,000 medical referrals for preventative health services.

Recovery
Over 30 years, approximately 300 individuals have graduated from the in-house drug and alcohol recovery program that is run in collaboration with Liberation Programs.

Jobs      
An estimated 4,500 clients have secured a job through the organization’s Job Readiness program, which assists clients in the areas of employment readiness, career planning, job search tools, resume preparation, educational and vocational training and referrals, and employment maintenance.

Outreach
In an effort to bring homeless individuals in off of the streets, dedicated case managers and members of the Homelessness Outreach Poverty Eradication (HOPE) project go out into the community providing emergency services, encouraging the homeless community to come to the shelter and offering helpful resources.

Veteran’s Services
The Supportive Services for Veteran’s Families Program, funded by grants, assists Veterans and their families who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, attempting to either maintain their housing or to rapidly re-house them.

 

We provide programs and services that are available at Pacific House emergency men’s shelter to men who stay at the shelter and to women via the Day Program.

Day Program
The Day Program operates 356 days per year, from 9 am. to 7 pm. at Pacific House shelter located at 597 Pacific Street in Stamford. A variety of support services are available to both men and women and focus on three primary areas: case management, employment development, and an in-house recovery program.

Young Adult Program
An increase in clients ages 18 - 24 is an alarming trend and Pacific House is commited to providing specific case management services, separate sleeping/hygience quarters, and assistance with handling the unique needs and challenges facing young adults who have no place to call home.

Case management
Five full-time case managers work closely with clients to develop plans based on individual needs. Clients meet with an assigned case manager for weekly counseling sessions and participate in onsite and community services as deemed appropriate.

Job Readiness
The Job Readiness program assists clients in the areas of employment readiness, career planning, job search tools, resume preparation, educational and vocational training and referrals, and employment maintenance. The Computer Cafe offers clients access to computers, email addresses, and classes to help with the job search via the Internet.

Recovery Program
Drug and alcohol addiction is a major cause of homelessness. The shelter operates an in-house recovery program in collaboration with Liberation Programs with the goal of helping clients adopt a more stable lifestyle without the use of alcohol or drugs.

Health Care
The emergency shelter also provides comprehensive primary healthcare services to all clients, regardless of insurance status, via a partnership with Optimus Health Care, Inc. Optimus representatives visit Pacific House two days each week. Each shelter client is encouraged to undergo a health screening shortly after their initial intake. Medical-related referrals are made as needed.

Outreach
In an effort to bring homeless individuals in off of the streets, dedicated case managers with expertise in drug treatment advocacy (DTA), and members of the Homelessness Outreach Poverty Eradication (HOPE) project go out into the community and inform homeless individuals (and persons at imminent risk for homelessness) about the services available to them.

Supportive Services for Veterans Families Program
This in-house program funded by grants assists veterans and their families who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless in an attempt to maintain their housing, and to rapidly re-house veteran families who have become homeless in lower Fairfield County. Among the assistance offered is housing counseling and search assistance, vocational rehabilitation counseling, educational and training assistance, and help to coordinate and obtain benefits.

Our Partners

Pacific House is actively involved with local sister agencies, statewide coalitions to help end homelessness, and other professional organizations that provide assistance: 

Greater Stamford / Greenwich Continuum of Care: We are a member of a coalition of homeless service providers and non-homeless related agencies that meet to develop housing options and services for the homeless of the greater Stamford/Greenwich areas.

Liberation Programs: Our in-house Recovery Program is collaboration with Liberation Programs (formerly LMG Programs), a licensed rehabilitation agency that helps assist those victimized by substance abuse. Shelter clients enrolled in the extensive Recovery Program receive counseling and participate in self-help groups in order to achieve sustained sobriety and adopt a stable lifestyle without the use of alcohol or drugs.

OPTIMUS: Clients’ health care is a priority and the shelter provides two medical examination rooms onsite at Pacific House that are used for health screenings and assessments of primary healthcare needs. Medical services are currently provided twice per week onsite and follow-up referrals connect shelter clients with other community health providers.

Food BankThe Food Bank provides food to the emergency shelter as well as to SFH supportive housing residents.

Salvation ArmyThe Salvation Army provides seasonal employment each year for a number of emergency shelter clients. The Salvation Army also provides donations of food, blankets and other essential items.

Person-to-PersonPerson-to-Person supplies clothing and security assistance for a number of shelter clients each year.

Inspirica: Previously known as St. Luke’s Life Works, this shelter handles referrals of women and families from our day program and collaborates on staff training programs.

DMHAS DMHAS provides staff training workshops and is a primary funder of emergency shelter operations.

Dept. of HealthThe Dept. of Health provides health screening and prevention workshops for Shelter clients.

The Dubois CenterThe Dubois Center provides mental health services as well as case management services for our clients.

Laurel House: Laurel House provides mental health services as well as supported housing units for our clients.

Connecticut Renaissance: Provides intensive substance and alcohol abuse outpatient treatment and mental health counseling for our shelter clients and Day program clients, men and women.

View Point Recovery Program: Provides short term and long term substance abuse inpatient treatment and residential long term care for male clients.

Charter Oak Communities: Previously known as Stamford Housing Authority, accepts shelter residents for permanent and Single Room Occupancy housing.

Shelter Plus Care- HUD (Housing and Urban Development) / DMHAS (Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services): Provides rental assistance and supportive services to homeless individuals who have serious mental illness, substance abuse disorder or HIV/AIDS.

 

Deeply affordable Housing: Updates

The #1 cause of homelessness is the lack of sufficient deeply-affordable permanent housing. Deeply-affordable permanent housing is a critical component of the solution to chronic homelessness, and Pacific House is leading the charge for developing this type of housing in Connecticut. Extensive research shows that homeless individuals with affordable permanent homes – some linked with supportive services - costs no more  (and most frequently as much as 50% less) than the emergency shelter-based model of care that exists today - while steadily reducing the total number of homeless individuals!

The agency has created and is currently operating deeply-affordable housing (some with supportive services) in Stamford and Norwalk:

Open and operating today
-Beacon I: 5 residents.
-Beacon II: 7 individuals in residence.
-Patricia C. Phillips House: 10 individuals will have housing (currently undergoing renovation).
-Parkview South (Norwalk): 24 single occupancy rooms are rented.
-Gateway opened in January 2017 with 16 tenants. 170 applications were received for these 16 slots.

Currently under construction or planned
-Lighthouse I (includes two houses in Stamford being converted to multi-unit housing)
-Parkview North in Norwalk 

2017 projections: 94 formerly homeless individuals will have deeply affordable permanent housing!
 

Board of Directors 2016-2017

Officers
Peter Rugen, Chairman
Chris Tate, Vice Chair
Erick R. Steen, Treasurer
Brad Mahaney, Secretary

Directors
Clifford Berger
Jim Bosek
James Calcagnini
Bjorn Forfang
Luke E. Imperatore, CFA
Tamara Kalin
Marc Malloy
Amy Mooney
Margaret Moscati
Andrew M. Reid

 

 

Pacific House Staff
Administrative office staff located at 137 Henry Street, Room 205, Stamford, CT 09602
Tel: 203-406-0017

Rafael Pagan Jr., LCSW, ACSW:  Executive Director

As Executive Director since August 2007, he has provided leadership in maintaining program integrity, achieving financial stability, presenting a balanced budget for the first time in many years, and leading the Board of Directors and staff in developing a strategic plan for the Agency.  He has established himself as a leader in advocating for the elimination of homelessness in Fairfield County. Mr. Pagan’s leadership has led the Shelter for the Homeless to be invited to become a member agency on the Board of Directors of Fairfield 08, a Not-for-Profit agency dedicated to the development of affordable supportive housing for the homeless in Southern Fairfield County. He is an active member of the HUD Continuum of Care Committee in Southern Fairfield County, and has been instrumental in establishing collaborative efforts with other not-for-profit agencies dealing with homelessness issues in Stamford.

Mr. Pagan is a graduate of the Fordham University Graduate School of Social Service, class of 1980. His breadth of experience prior to coming to Stamford included serving as Associate Executive Director of Metropolitan Hospital in NYC, overseeing a budget of $15 million. Mr. Pagan’s most recent positions in housing for special needs population include Director of Social Services at Urban Health Plan in the South Bronx 2006 – 2007, Director of the Department of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities at East Harlem Council of Community Improvement 2004 to 2006, and Director of Community Residences at South Bronx Mental Health 2001 to 2004. 

 Jerome Roberts, MBA: Associate Executive Director / Director of Housing

Mr. Roberts currently serves as Associate Director and has worked as the Director of Public Grants and Community Relations, Operations Manager, Residential Services Director, Emergency Housing Director and Case Manager at Pacific House emergency shelter since 1992.

Mr. Roberts’s primary responsibilities include oversight of operations and work with federal, state and municipal agencies to secure continued funding for the Shelter for the Homeless. Prior to joining the shelter, he served as the Southwest Connecticut Homeless Outreach Project and Evaluation (SWCT HOPE) Director, a regional project that worked from Bridgeport to Stamford to enlist homeless and at-risk populations into SSA programs and benefits.

Mr. Roberts represents Shelter for the Homeless at many state and local coalitions and groups such as the Affordable Housing Action Collaborative; Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness; Statewide Homeless Management Information System; the Greater Stamford/Greenwich Continuum of Care; and the State of Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services Recovery Advisory Group. He sits on a number of local community boards such as the Waterside Coalitions, ABBDS Association, and Homes for the Brave. 

Mr. Roberts holds a Masters of Business Administration from University of New Haven, and a BS in Natural Science and Mathematics from Dowling College. He is certified instructor of Non-Violent Crisis Intervention and Prevention, American Heart Association Basic Life Skill Instructor, and Adkins Life Skills Educator.

Andrew J. Barer, MA, CMC:  Director of Development and Communications

Andrew Barer is an accomplished entrepreneur, executive and public speaker. Prior to joining Shelter for the Homeless, he spent more than twenty-five years as a senior sales manager and as a consultant for companies in the financial services industry.

Andrew has extensive experience helping sales executives and managers become more effective. His creative approaches to sales training, coaching, and the ongoing reinforcement of critical sales concepts and skills have helped increase sales and profitability at leading financial services companies including JP Morgan, MetLife and American Express.

In addition, Andrew has a Masters Degree in Psychology and is a Certified Executive Coach.  As an educator and executive coach, Andrew has been a pioneer in using the Internet to enhance and maintain participant benefits from sales training.  He developed a proprietary web-based learning network for American Express that was rolled out across the country and internationally. 

In 2005 as an entrepreneur, Andrew co-founded EKKO Technologies, a ground-breaking company in the imaging industry.  He led the effort to secure funding for the company and, as President, led a sales effort that generated $1.5mm in the company’s first year.

In the fall of 1999, Andrew raised $2.5 million in seed capital and launched PPINetwork.com, a company providing web-based Customer Relationship Management services for businesses in the $15 billion promotional products industry.

Prior to founding PPINetwork.com, he ran the East Coast business for Champion Athletic, where he was responsible for $50 million in revenue.

Andrew is the Founder and Executive Director of the Common Ground Foundation, a non-profit organization that brings leadership development and business training programs to youths on the Navajo and Blackfeet Indian Reservations.  Andrew is also on the Board of Directors of the Easton Learning Foundation, an organization that supports educational initiatives in the town in which he lives.

Andrew has led wilderness expeditions to Glacier National Park (Montana), Denali National Park (Alaska), and the Mingan Islands (Canada). A graduate of Wesleyan University and the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Andrew lives in Easton, Connecticut with his wife Debbi and three children: Logan (20) and twins Eli and Milo (18).

 

Our Partners

Pacific House is actively involved with local sister agencies, statewide coalitions to help end homelessness, and other professional organizations that provide assistance: 

Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness: The Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness, in partnership with members and communities throughout the state, creates change through leadership, advocacy, and building the capacity of members and the field to respond to challenges. Our collective mission is to prevent and end homelessness in Connecticut.

Greater Stamford / Greenwich Continuum of Care: We are a member of a coalition of homeless service providers and non-homeless related agencies that meet to develop housing options and services for the homeless of the greater Stamford/Greenwich areas.

Liberation Programs: Our in-house Recovery Program is collaboration with Liberation Programs (formerly LMG Programs), a licensed rehabilitation agency that helps assist those victimized by substance abuse. Shelter clients enrolled in the extensive Recovery Program receive counseling and participate in self-help groups in order to achieve sustained sobriety and adopt a stable lifestyle without the use of alcohol or drugs.

OPTIMUS: Clients’ health care is a priority and the shelter provides two medical examination rooms onsite at Pacific House that are used for health screenings and assessments of primary healthcare needs. Medical services are currently provided twice per week onsite and follow-up referrals connect shelter clients with other community health providers.

Food Bank: The Food Bank provides food to the emergency shelter as well as to SFH supportive housing residents.

Salvation Army: The Salvation Army provides seasonal employment each year for a number of emergency shelter clients. The Salvation Army also provides donations of food, blankets and other essential items.

Person-to-Person: Person-to-Person supplies clothing and security assistance for a number of shelter clients each year.

Inspirica: Previously known as St. Luke’s Life Works, this shelter handles referrals of women and families from our day program and collaborates on staff training programs.

DMHAS:  DMHAS provides staff training workshops and is a primary funder of emergency shelter operations.

Dept. of Health: The Dept. of Health provides health screening and prevention workshops for Shelter clients.

The Dubois Center: The Dubois Center provides mental health services as well as case management services for our clients.

Laurel House: Laurel House provides mental health services as well as supported housing units for our clients.

Connecticut Renaissance: Provides intensive substance and alcohol abuse outpatient treatment and mental health counseling for our shelter clients and Day program clients, men and women.

View Point Recovery Program: Provides short term and long term substance abuse inpatient treatment and residential long term care for male clients.

Charter Oak Communities: Previously known as Stamford Housing Authority, accepts shelter residents for permanent and Single Room Occupancy housing.

Shelter Plus Care- HUD (Housing and Urban Development) / DMHAS (Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services): Provides rental assistance and supportive services to homeless individuals who have serious mental illness, substance abuse disorder or HIV/AIDS.

 

In the News: 

Pacific House raises $100,000 at fundraiser
Stamford Advocate, April 12, 2017

Young men given a chance with shelter’s new program
Stamford Advocate, January 7, 2017

A volunteer’s legacy endures at Stamford Christmas dinner (Men’s Club of Congregation Agudath Sholom, a modern Orthodox synagogue on Strawberry Hill Avenue)
Stamford Advocate, December 26, 2016

New home a ‘spectacular’ gift for former Pitney Bowes worker
Stamford Advocate, December 23, 2016

Stamford service recognizes homeless deaths
Stamford Advocate, December 22, 2016

Stamford unveils 'deeply affordable' apartments
News12, December 13, 2016

Pacific House completes Stamford affordable housing development
Stamford Advocate, December 13, 2016

Annual Shippan Turkey Trot draws hundreds
Stamford Advocate, November 24, 2016

Officials Serve Meal at Stamford homeless shelter
Stamford Advocate, November 22, 2016

Pacific House receives grant from Community Fund of Darien
Stamford Advocate, July 27, 2016

Fairfield County Community Foundation provides $25,000 grant to Shelter for the Homeless
Stamford Advocate, July 14, 2016

Phillips to be honored at Rays of Hope Gala
Stamford Advocate, April 26, 2016

GHS Homeless Club Visits Pacific House Shelter
Greenwich Sentinel, November 25, 2015

Two homeless veterans get new Stamford apartments
Stamford Advocate, November 11, 2015

Pacific House Dinner Service Hot Meals Served At Pacific House Emergency Men's Shelter By Volunteers With Heart.
Stamford Patch, September 4, 2015

Project Puts Spotlight on Homelessness in Stamford
Stamford Daily Voice, August 5, 2015

30 Years Of Providing Shelter For The Homeless
Greenwich Post, August 3, 2015

30 Years of Providing Shelter for the Homeless
Hey Stamford! August 2, 2015

Steven Ayres Hometown Hero
News12 CT July 2015

Pacific House homeless shelter celebrates 30th anniversary
Stamford Daily Voice, July 25, 2015

30 years of shelter, with no judgment: Stamford’s Shelter for the Homeless celebrates anniversary
Stamford Advocate, July 23, 2015

First County Bank Foundation Donates $10,000 to Shelter for the Homeless
Stamford Patch, July 15, 2015

LETTER: Extends heartfelt thanks to supporters of Rays of Hope gala
Greenwich Post, July 6, 2015

Rays Of Hope Gala Benefits Homeless Shelter In Stamford
Stamford Daily Voice, May 19, 2015

Jim Bosek Hometown Hero
News12 CT May 2015

Sandi Mond’s Recipe for Life (Gala 2015 Honoree)
Stamford Advocate, April 25, 2015

Shelter for the Homeless Builds More Affordable Housing
It’s Relevant, March 23, 2015

Stamford legislators applaud $2.5M affordable housing grant
The Hour, March 16, 2015

SEEN: Chocolate, Dessert and Wine Lovers' Evening in Stamford
Stamford Advocate, February 5, 2015

New Affordable Housing Units Open on Ann Street
The Hour, September 4, 2014

Stamford Homeless Shelters Over Capacity
Stamford Advocate, January 14, 2014